Tag Archives: previous learning

City Knowledge Exchange: Baseline Best Practice – Manchester

Electric Cargo Bike Hires: Oxford Road Corridor – Last Mile Delivery

Introduction

Manchester City Council received funding to purchase four electric-assist cargo bikes for use free of charge by local businesses and organisations in and around the Manchester Oxford Road Corridor. The bikes have been loaned to various local SMEs, as well as partner university departments. The are being used to make low carbon, convenient deliveries of everything from parcels, food, and Lego


Aim

As the Oxford Road Corridor has restricted automobile access, the City Council had an interest in trialling new solutions for last mile delivery for the local businesses along the corridor. By facilitating a cargo bike hire scheme, local SMEs and the universities along the corridor did not need to invest in upfront costs for cargo bikes and were able to trial the solution before committing to it.

Process

Manchester City Council received €40,000 from the Triangulum project. They procured the services of Manchester Bike Hire (MBH), a cycle logistics company. MBH offer a full wraparound service to bicycle users, with trial sessions to identify the most suitable bicycles and train riders. They also ensure the bicycles are maintained. These services, along with general logistics advice, have been invaluable.

Bicycle telematics log journey data programmatically via a web API.

Success Factors

The bikes have telematics installed. These monitor the journeys undertaken, and detailed information is available about journeys, as well as the emissions reductions achieved. The bikes are free of charge and available on a three month loan. They can replace a car or van journey, as well as being more convenient within the new traffic restrictions (no vehicles except bicycles,buses and taxis between 6am – 9pm) on Oxford Road. The cargo bikes can also save significant amounts of time on deliveries.

 

They also promote business’ ‘green credentials’.

 

Stakeholders

Who was involved and what did they contribute?

  • Manchester City Council – Facilitated the scheme between Manchester Bike Hire, the logistics company, the universities and local SMEs
  • Manchester Bike Hire – Provided bikes for the hire scheme
  • SeeSense – Cycle logistics, tracking and analytics
  • Universities – Participated in the scheme to decrease the emissions outputs, encouraged within university departments
  • Local SMEs – Participated in the scheme to improve last mile delivery down the corridor

 

Challenges & Lessons Learnt

  • Procurement: we wanted to work with a local company who could provide the proper bespoke service
  • Purchase vs Hire: we can usually “buy” things as a council – but if it’s a service then it can be more problematic – both within European funding and within the council – but we didn’t have the resource or experience to run a bike hire scheme ourselves
  • Moving from a “free” model to a sustainable business model
  • Making Data available from a proprietary API
  • A ‘cycling champion’ within partner organisations is key. For those not already regular cyclists, the electric-assist function and size of the bikes can appear challenging. Moving to cycling from driving is also a behaviour change, which is why a champion is vital.
  • Protective equipment, and whether this is required, has been challenging.
  • Storage of a larger than average bicycle out of the elements has also proved a challenge for small organisations.

 

Achievements

The bike hire scheme has allowed several SMEs to improve the logistics of their last mile delivery in response to the new traffic restrictions along the corridor without having to pay upfront costs for a solution they had not trialed. It has been very successful with the SMEs, more so than the university departments which were encouraged by the universities to participate. This is likely because the SMEs had a significant need to improve logistics due to the new traffic restrictions while the university still had vehicle access to alternate campus entrances from Oxford Road negating the necessity of innovative delivery solutions.

Current Status

The cargo bike hire scheme is an active project that the City Council are managing under the Triangulum project.

More information

Follow us on Twitter @Triangulum_EU or visit our website http://triangulum-project.eu

City Knowledge Exchange: Baseline Best Practice – Milan

Sharing of the Milan Interoperability Platform: The reuse by the Municipality of Venice

 

Introduction

In 2017, the Municipality of Venice identified WSO2 as the most appropriate platform to develop its new interoperability system, in order to provide a better citizen experience for its digital services.  During the software selection process the inhouse ITC company of the City of Venice discovered that the Municipality of Milan had adopted the same platform in 2015. Following technical contacts and meetings at the end of 2017 an exchange process has been agreed and Milan shared the machine copies of the interoperability platform with the Venice IT offices. To avoid privacy and security issues the configuration administrator password and database contents were not shared. Venice received all the optimized solutions as just installed.

Aim

The general goal of reuse is that public administrations that are confronted with a specific problem can benefit from the work of others, by accessing solutions that have proven their value elsewhere. This is a virtuous process that generates cost and time-savings, and when this takes the form of a collaborative platform, the benefits can be even more extensive. This also makes it a major contributor to the development of a digital single market in the EU.

 

Process

The process was very agile. During 2017 the Municipality of Venice, through Venis S.p.A., the inhouse ITC company of the City of Venice, was looking for an interoperability solution through the support of a consultant that identified WS02 as the most appropriate one. Furthermore, they discovered through an online search of public calls for tenders, that Milan, Turin and Umbria Region in Italy had already adopted WS02 platform. Venis contacted Milan and after a meeting gave an expression of interest, which let to Milan sharing the architecture. Milan copied the database and Venis was able to install the full solution. The total process lasted less than 4 months, but in terms of working time, it was 2 working days for Milan and 7 working days for Venis (5 for installation and configuration).

Success factors

The success factors are the followings:

    • The process was really agile and fast; Major time and cost-saving for Venice
    • Venice received a solution that was already optimized; An open solution has been spread out with the possibility to create a collaborative platform.

 

 

Stakeholders

  • Municipality of Milan – Direction of Information Systems and Digital Agenda agreed to share the Interoperability solution adopted.
  • Venis S.p.A. – Venice Information Technology & Systems that designs, develops and manages the City of Venice IT System and Telecommunications network.

 

Challenges & Lessons Learnt

Venis was looking for a possibility of reuse and they discovered by searching online for bids to assign a consultancy for WS02 support. More information on the solution used and openness of municipalities in sharing those solutions could help to increase sharing and reuse.

The process was conducted without being properly communicated, which also could have helped increase sharing and reuse. A fundamental aspect of the re-use in the context of public administration is that they receive the software free of charge from the transferring administration, and acquire it by supporting only the costs of its adaptation, and not those of planning and realization. Furthermore, reuse and sharing can be effectively supported by collaborative platforms.

 

Achievements

The reuse of the Milan interoperability platform has produced a reduction of time resources spent by Venice: in 7 working days they achieved an optimized solution that for Milan costed 220 working days. This means a time saving of 97%. The achievement was of course in terms of money savings a part for the development of the solution and its optimization, but also for the external support.

 

Current Status

The use case is completed. Venis is using the interoperability platform and they are developing services that will be in production in June.

 

More information

www.comune.milano.it

www.venis.it